Local Government

The New York City Department of City Planning Ten-Year Capital Strategy, 2022 (NYCDCP)

The New York City Department of City Planning on Tuesday unveiled a new website [Ten-Year Capital Strategy, 2022]  https://tycs.planning.nyc.gov/overview with details about its integrated strategy for building and enhancing city infrastructure, including everything from maintaining public buildings and facilities, schools, roads and bridges, housing, stormwater and wastewater management, water supply and treatment, parks, mass transit and more.

Guiding Principles:

GP1. Maintain New York City’s financial responsibility

GP2. Promote forward-looking, holistic capital planning that anticipates citywide and neighborhood needs of tomorrow,

GP3. Advance a more equitable New York City through capital investment,

GP4. Consider community perspectives in capital planning and decision-making

Examples of online tools for residents to identify and advocate for community needs…DCP’s Community District Profiles is an interactive web tool that makes detailed data about community districts directly accessible to the public.

Community District Profile Manhattan Community Board 6 communityprofiles.planning.nyc.gov/manhattan/6


The New York Young Republican Club


The NYC Budget process

How does NYC’s budget process work?
[Source: City & State Excelsior – Making sense of New York politics email 5/27/2021]
 

The budget process begins on July 1, which is the start of the city’s fiscal year.

By September 3, the Mayor is expected to release a capital commitment plan, which details the plans and budget for major city projects, such as building public schools and street maintenance, that are financed by debt and typically take multiple years to complete. The capital budget is separate from the city’s yearly expense budget. The executive budget includes funding for city departments, local offices for borough presidents and district attorneys, and the city’s debt service, which helps finance capital projects.

The Mayor’s Office of Management and Budget – which is in charge of all things related to the budget – creates revenue projections that takes into account all of the “city taxes, user charges, federal and state grants, and other revenues such as licenses, permits, and fines” the city can expect to receive in the coming year, which influences how the budget is created.

By October 31, community boards are expected to submit their capital and expense budgets and priorities to the Mayor’s Office of Management and Budget.

In January, the mayor is expected to share a preliminary outline of the budget.

Between January and February, community boards submit their responses to the mayor’s outlined proposal to both the mayor and the New York City Council.

In March, the NYC Council submits its budget proposal and borough presidents are also expected to submit their recommendations in response to the mayor’s preliminary budget.

In April, the mayor submits an executive budget and “message from the mayor,” along with a 10-year capital strategy, which indicates all of the city’s capital needs over the course of the next decade, if it is an odd year.

In May, the council holds hearings to discuss the executive budget and then pushes for any changes or amendments. This is where we currently are in the budget process, and if you’re interested, you can watch the council’s budget hearings remotely.

Both the mayor and the City Council are expected to agree on a finalized budget by June 5, although the budget doesn’t always come in on time. If a new budget doesn’t get finalized by June 30, which is the end of the city’s fiscal year, then the last year’s budget will continue to be used until the new budget is passed. 

Learn more at www1.nyc.gov/site/omb/about/new-york-city-budget-cycle.page


The NYC Citywide Information Portal and 311

The NYC Citywide Information Portal www1.nyc.gov/site/coronavirus/resources/resources-for-new-yorkers.page and 311 https://portal.311.nyc.gov/ have created COVID-specific resource guides for New Yorkers. These resource guides contain information related to emotional well-being, rent and housing, NYCHA residents, and more. Get information and resources to help protect yourself and others from COVID-19 www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/covid/covid-19-main.page.


Trees Count! 2015 NYC Parks Department Tree Map & Catalog

The Department of Parks and Recreation just launched Trees Count! 2015, and now they need your help! Volunteers provide vital data by going out and mapping the trees in their neighborhood. You can sign up by visiting the link below or by emailing TreesCount@parks.nyc.gov. Please join this important effort!


U.S. EPA Current air quality by zipcode airnow.gov

Contact information and ask questions at https://www.airnow.gov/contact-us


Mail:
U.S. EPA 
Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS)
Information Transfer Group
Mail Code C404-07
Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
Fax:
(919)541-0242


U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)

SBA New York District Office
26 Federal Plaza Suite 3100
New York, NY

Phone: 212-264-4354

Fax: 212-264-4963

SBA’s core operations are focused around Capital, Contracting and Counseling.

Capital: SBA guarantees loans to businesses to help them start, grow and succeed.

Contracting: SBA serves as an advocate on behalf of small businesses, helping ensure small businesses have access to the nearly $100 billion of federal contracts available to them.

Counseling: SBA provides counseling and training to small businesses around the country through a national network of more than 14,000 resource partners including Small Business Development Centers, Women’s Business Centers, Veteran Business Centers and SCORE. SBA-supported counseling and training makes a difference: Those who receive counseling and training are more likely to start businesses, their businesses are more likely to survive over the ensuing years, and they are better prepared to seek financing and to plan effectively for future business growth.

In addition, there are local events, e-learning and videos available as resources.

You can sign up for their emails and register with them at: https://www.sba.gov/user/register

To receive info about SBA-related training and events exclusively in your area, take a moment to input your zip code at http://www.sba.gov/updates.


Weigh in on bills introduced in the New York State Senate

You can weigh in on bills introduced in the New York State Senate.

Tap the link and search for the bill https://www.nysenate.gov/search/legislation

under “Do you support this bill?” tap “Aye” or “Nay”.

Optional: add a personal message. Make sure to do this if you had trouble voting that any of these bills would fix. The first time you do this, you will need to enter your name and address (make sure you expand the address field to enter your city, state and zip code as well), and then validate the email that they send to ensure you’re a real person. You can request status updates.

EXAMPLE: PENDING LEGISLATION TO IMPROVE VOTING

S8015B: Codifies the expansion of expanded absentee voting for the duration of the public health crisis nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2019/S8015/amendment/B?link_id=0&can_id=4348a72b34d224d4417e94f6661d8d8c


Welcome to the New York City Tenant Resource Portal

Welcome to the New York City Tenant Resource Portal

The goal of this portal is to help tenants across the city find the resources they need in one place. We understand these are uncertain and stressful times and the City is here to help you maintain stable housing.

This eviction prevention tool was designed by the Mayor’s Office to Protect Tenants (MOPT) and the Mayor’s Public Engagement Unit’s (PEU) Tenant Support Unit (TSU) to help renters navigate public and private resources that can stabilize their housing situation. A tenant seeking help will be taken through a series of questions and directed to the most useful resources based on their responses. MOPT and PEU have included resources from multiple city agencies, Legal Service Providers, and Community Based Organizations.

If you are a Legal Service Provider or Community Based Organization, we welcome your recommendations of additional resources via the online feedback form.

www1.nyc.gov/content/tenantresourceportal


Which ID/Driver’s License is right for you?

ID documents are provided at the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles

Which ID is right for me?

New York State offers three types of documents

Customers have three options when it comes to getting a driver license, permit, or non-driver ID in New York State.  

  • Enhanced 
  • REAL ID
  • Standard 

After October 1, 2020, only the Enhanced or REAL ID will be accepted to get on a domestic plane (flights within the U.S.), enter certain federal buildings or military bases. 

If you already have a Passport, you can use that to board a plane or enter a federal building without needing an Enhanced or REAL ID.

Which type is right for you?

Answer the yes/no questions below to find out. 

  1. Do you want to use your license/ID to board a domestic (U.S.) flight?   
  2. Do you want to use your license/ID to enter a federal building or military base?   
  3. Do you want to use your license/ID to cross into the U.S. border (by land or sea) coming from Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean?   

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions, you should get an Enhanced driver license, permit or ID card, if you are a U.S. Citizen.

If you answered “no” to all questions, you should get a Standard driver license, permit or ID card.

Be prepared for your office visit

Now that you know which document type you want, complete this guide to be sure you have the proof of identification you need before coming to an office.  

What documents do you need to bring to a DMV office?

ENHANCED

An Enhanced license, permit, or non-driver ID can be used

  • to board a domestic flight (within the U.S.)
  • to enter a federal building or military base
  • to cross a U.S. border coming from Canada, Mexico, and some Caribbean countries
  • for photo identification purposes 

Enhanced

  • is Federal REAL ID compliant
  • costs an additional $30 on top of the regular transaction fees
  • requires an office visit to prove your identity
    • *if your name has changed bring in marriage certificate(s), divorce decree(s) or court order document(s)
    • NY State residency
    • U.S. citizenship
    • date of birth
    • Social Security status
  • shows your full legal name (first, middle, last)
  • shows your residential address (where you live)
  • has an American flag displayed on the document

REAL ID

A REAL ID license, permit, or non-driver ID can be used

  • to board a domestic flight (within the U.S.)
  • to enter a federal building or military base
  • for photo identification purposes 

REAL ID 

  • is Federal REAL ID compliant
  • does not have additional cost, but all regular transaction fees will apply
  • requires an office visit to prove your identity
    • *if your name has changed bring in marriage certificate(s), divorce decree(s) or court order document(s)
    • NY State residency
    • lawful presence in the U.S.
    • Social Security status
  • shows your full legal name (first, middle, last)
  • shows your residential address (where you live)
  • has a star displayed on the document
  • For more information please visit the about Federal REAL ID webpage.

STANDARD

A Standard license, permit, or non-driver ID can be used

  • to board a domestic flight only until October 1, 2020
  • for photo identification purposes 

Standard

  • is not Federal REAL ID compliant
  • does not have additional cost, but all regular transaction fees will apply
  • does not require an office visit to replace or renew
  • shows your mailing address
  • will require a second form of identification to board a flight after October 1, 2020
  • has “NOT FOR FEDERAL PURPOSES” displayed on the document if issued after October 30, 2017

*If issued before October 30, 2017 and is not Enhanced, you have a Standard document.

Summary of the difference between Standard, Enhanced and REAL ID documents

Document TypeEnhanced
(EDL)
Federal
REAL ID
Standard*
Displayed on document
IdentificationYesYesYes
Boarding a domestic (U.S.) flight, entering a Federal Building or Military Base (starting October, 2020)YesYesNo
U.S. Border Crossing from Canada, Mexico and some Caribbean countriesYesNoNo